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Ed.D Portal

Welcome

Welcome to the Ed.D. portal!

This site is designed to introduce you to the Doctor of Education program and the resources available to you.

Use the tabs across the top of the page to navigate through resources, coursework, APA mechanics, and dissertation resources. Some of the tabs will have subtabs with additional information. If you have trouble finding information about your topic, contact edd@seu.edu for help.

Southeastern’s Doctor of Education program features an interdisciplinary approach to leadership in education, business, ministry, research, policy, and nonprofit institutions.

Concentrations are designed to prepare individuals to enhance their leadership, evaluation, and advocacy skills in organizations requiring advanced abilities and expertise.

The program, which includes 54 credit hours, will prepare individuals to be well-rounded, qualified servant leaders who can take on the challenges facing organizations of all kinds.

Benefits of the SEU program include instruction from faculty members with decades of experience in their respective fields, a flexible, asynchronous delivery method that maximizes research time, face-to-face instruction, and the foundation of a Christian worldview.

Overview of EdD Program

Welcome to Southeastern University’s EdD Program!

The Southeastern University EdD program is designed to provide students with advanced preparation for critical leadership roles in a variety of professions.

The following five foundational fluencies, which are core principles of the program, are taught and assessed throughout the program:

  • analytic inquiry
  • quantitative and qualitative research
  • communication
  • evaluation
  • servant leadership

The Doctor of Education program is a non-licensure program.  If candidates wish to obtain any type of state certification, they will need to contact their state department of education for specific requirements and applications.

Total Credits

  • 54 Credit hours with four components:
    • Doctoral Core (12 hours)
    • Research Core (12 hours)
    • Concentration (18 hours)
    • Dissertation (a minimum of 12 hours)

Transfer Credits

  • Graduate credit may be accepted from an accredited university if the credits are not part of any previously earned degree.
    • A student cannot transfer into the doctoral program courses that were taken for a master’s or specialist degree. 
    • Transfer credits must be doctoral-level courses relevant to coursework at SEU which were earned less than 7 years previously at an accredited university.
  • The EdD Committee will evaluate and award transfer credit based on a case-by-case basis. 
  • The College of Education EdD Committee has determined that once a student begins coursework as an EdD student at SEU, no transient credit (future courses taken at another university) will be accepted without prior approval.

Program Length

  • 3-4 years
  • Full-time students (6 credit hours per 16 week semester; one 3 credit course every 8 weeks)
  • Part-time student (3 credit hours per semester; one 3 credit course every 16 weeks)
  • Dissertation Phase - 2 credit hours minimum per 16 week semester (Students may enroll in a maximum of 16 dissertation credits).
  • Once students enter the dissertation phase, the student must stay continuously enrolled (spring, summer, and fall).

Program Delivery

  • The EdD program runs continuously throughout the year, with 8-week courses offered in the fall, spring, and summer semesters.
  • Hybrid model - online courses and two one-week intensive courses completed on campus as face-to-face courses either in January or June corresponding to cohort start dates.
    • Note: Intensives are conducted each spring and summer. Students will enroll in the semester that corresponds to when they began the program.
  • Dissertation proposal defense and dissertation proposal on campus or from a remote location according to an arrangement with the dissertation chair and committee members.

Handbooks and Guides

Welcome to Southeastern University’s EdD Program!

The Southeastern University EdD program is designed to provide students with advanced preparation for critical leadership roles in a variety of professions.

The following five foundational fluencies, which are core principles of the program, are taught and assessed throughout the program:

  • analytic inquiry
  • quantitative and qualitative research
  • communication
  • evaluation
  • servant leadership

The Doctor of Education program is a non-licensure program.  If candidates wish to obtain any type of state certification, they will need to contact their state department of education for specific requirements and applications.

Total Credits

  • 54 Credit hours with four components:
    • Doctoral Core (12 hours)
    • Research Core (12 hours)
    • Concentration (18 hours)
    • Dissertation (a minimum of 12 hours)

Transfer Credits

  • Graduate credit may be accepted from an accredited university if the credits are not part of any previously earned degree.
    • A student cannot transfer into the doctoral program courses that were taken for a master’s or specialist degree. 
    • Transfer credits must be doctoral-level courses relevant to coursework at SEU which were earned less than 7 years previously at an accredited university.
  • The EdD Committee will evaluate and award transfer credit based on a case-by-case basis. 
  • The College of Education EdD Committee has determined that once a student begins coursework as an EdD student at SEU, no transient credit (future courses taken at another university) will be accepted without prior approval.

Program Length

  • 3-4 years
  • Full-time students (6 credit hours per 16 week semester; one 3 credit course every 8 weeks)
  • Part-time student (3 credit hours per semester; one 3 credit course every 16 weeks)
  • Dissertation Phase - 2 credit hours minimum per 16 week semester (Students may enroll in a maximum of 16 dissertation credits).
  • Once students enter the dissertation phase, the student must stay continuously enrolled (spring, summer, and fall).

Program Delivery

  • The EdD program runs continuously throughout the year, with 8-week courses offered in the fall, spring, and summer semesters.
  • Hybrid model - online courses and two one-week intensive courses completed on campus as face-to-face courses either in January or June corresponding to cohort start dates.
    • Note: Intensives are conducted each spring and summer. Students will enroll in the semester that corresponds to when they began the program.
  • Dissertation proposal defense and dissertation proposal on campus or from a remote location according to an arrangement with the dissertation chair and committee members.

Entrance Requirements

Entrance Requirements

All of the components listed below are required and will be utilized by the College of Education Ed.D. Committee in making an admittance decision. Other requirements are detailed on the application.

Applicants are considered on a case-by-case basis, and the decision of the committee is final.

  • Regionally accredited graduate degree with at least a 3.0 GPA on a 4.0 scale
  • Current professional vita
  • Christian faith statement (two- to three-page essay)
  • Minimum of three full-time years of successful experience in a related field
  • Professional writing sample: minimum of five pages (Examples: articles, graduate research papers/assignments, published work, etc.)
  • Two letters of recommendation
    • One professional recommendation
    • One personal recommendation
  • Background check consent form
  • For non-native English speakers a current TOEFL score at the mean level or higher

Failure to meet one of these standards may not immediately disqualify a candidate depending upon the strength of the other components. For example, an applicant with a 3.5 GPA but only two years of experience may still be considered by the Ed.D. admissions committee.

Non-Degree Seeking

Students may take up to 18 hours as a non-degree seeking student. This classification may appeal to students already holding a graduate degree who need further graduate hours to qualify for teaching a specific discipline at the university level. Specific concentration courses may especially be helpful for this goal.

Taking courses as a non-degree seeking student may also appeal to individuals who are not yet sure if a doctoral degree is their goal, but want to explore the possibility. Contact the graduate admissions office for details on admissions criteria for the courses desired.

Course Rotation and Audit Sheet

Click below to download the Degree Audit Sheet.

Note: Please make sure you select the audit sheet of your intended concentration and cohort!

Information is current as of January 4, 2022

Academic Integrity Policy

Student Reference Request and FERPA Release

Writing Support Resources

Dissertation Overview

NOTE: Dissertation Topic must be approved prior to the proposal defense.

  • Last day to defend for spring commencement: March 15
  • Last day to defend for fall commencement: October 15

The dissertation process is divided into benchmark stages designed to help you complete the dissertation in a timely fashion. Use the Dissertation Checklist to guide you as you proceed through the process.

These dissertation stages are guidelines for progress throughout the development of the dissertation. Some students will take longer, while some will take less time. You also should be aware and consider that holidays, semester

Dissertation Phase Time Limits

Students may enroll in dissertation courses for no more than eight semesters (maximum of 16 credits of dissertation credits). If a student is unable to defend the dissertation before the end of the eighth semester in the dissertation phase, he or she may petition for a one-semester extension.

Click on the chapter tabs to read about each dissertation phase.

Committee

The dissertation committee consists of a minimum of three members:

  1. The chair of the dissertation committee, who must be a COE faculty member with a terminal degree (assigned by the COE).
  2. A second reader with appropriate credentials and approval by the COE.  The second reader will function as the research methodologist (assigned by the COE).
  3. A third reader (typically a topic/content expert) with appropriate credentials and approval by the dissertation chair, Ed.D. chair and COE dean.

You are responsible to consult with your dissertation chair in the selection of your third reader from either within or outside SEU to serve on the dissertation committee.  The third reader must have:

  1. A terminal degree
  2. Verifiable graduate faculty status at the institution where he/she serves and/or outstanding professional experience that warrants inclusion on the committee.

Documentation of the external reader’s credentials should be submitted to the Ed.D. chair for approval prior to making a commitment to the third reader.

In general, you should request committee members who have specialized expertise in your specific area of research interest.

Deadlines

Before your chair can schedule your dissertation defense with the EdD administrative assistant, you must submit an Editor Verification form and receive approval for each chapter of the dissertation from the following:

  1. Each member of your dissertation committee 
  2. The University Review Committee

Please be aware that each committee member may take up to twenty business days to review each chapter. The University Review Committee may take up to thirty business days to review your final dissertation. If revisions are required, the dissertation may be subject to an additional approval process.

Therefore, submit your dissertation well in advance of defense deadlines and make travel plans to defend your dissertation only after your dissertation has received full approval.

  • Last day to defend for spring commencement: March 15
  • Last day to defend for fall commencement: October 15

Dissertation Proposal and Chapter 1-3 - Proposal

Complete an exhaustive review of relevant literature on your topic.

Note: You will not be writing your review during this phase; however, you will use this research to develop chapter 2.

Develop your research proposal in conjunction with your Dissertation Chair and the research methodologists.

Note: Dissertation proposals are written in the future tense. The proposal becomes the basis for chapter 1 of the dissertation, which is later written in the past tense.

Pre-Dissertation Discussions

  • Begin narrowing dissertation topic and design.

Proposal

  • Search library databases for studies/literature related to your topic.

  • Discuss proposal.

    • Communicate weekly or bi-weekly with your chair as you prepare the proposal.

    • Download Grammarly. (grammarly.com)

    • Send your chair the problem/purpose statement and 5-10 potential research questions and identify the type of study (qualitative/quantitative).

    • Discuss theoretical framework or conceptual framework with your chair.

  • Send the Dissertation Planning Guide to your chair.

  • Submit the Dissertation Topic Approval form to your chair. Your chair will obtain the needed signatures and email the completed form to the EdD administrative assistant upon approval.

  • Meet with your chair and then your methodologist to finalize the problem statement, purpose statement, research questions, and methodology.

  • Draft proposal. Be sure to use the proposal template.

  • Identify the third reader (see document for third reader qualifications).

  • Your chair sends the written proposal to the methodologist and the third reader.

  • Update your CITI Training (if necessary) in preparation for IRB application.

  • Your chair sets a proposal defense date with EdD administrative assistant.

  • Complete the proposal defense

  • Your chair submits the proposal defense rubric to EdD administrative assistant

  • Work with your chair to develop an outline for chapter two.

  • Dissertation Checklist for 2021 proposal defenses

    Use this checklist if defending the proposal after January 1, 2021.

  • Defense Rubric

  • Dissertation Planning Guide

  • Proposal Defense Qualitative Revised

    Revised 2/24/21

  • Proposal Defense Quantitative Revised

    Revised on 2/24/21

  • Topic Approval Form - Dissertation

    To fill out the editable PDF form, please follow these instructions:

    1. After the PDF opens in a new window, download, and save the PDF to your computer. (Do not make any changes to the document when it opens in a new window.)
    2. Locate the PDF file on your computer and open the document with Adobe Pro or Adobe Reader. (Do not open the document from the downloads bar at the bottom of your page.)
    3. After you open the document from your computer, make your changes and save your work.
  • MIXED METHODS Explanatory-Sequential Proposal Template

  • Qualitative Template

  • Quantitative Template

  • Third Reader Letter

  • Organizing Your Social Sciences Research Paper: Theoretical Framework

    This link goes to a resource from the University of Southern California. The resource defines theories, discusses the importance of theory, provides strategies for developing the theoretical framework for your study, and gives writing tips.

  • Understanding, Selecting, and Integrating a Theoretical Framework in Dissertation Research: Creating the Blueprint for your "House"

    This is an article that provides guidelines on how to "select and integrate a theoretical framework to structure all aspects of the research process" (Grant and Osanloo, n.d., abstract).

Dissertation Proposal and Chapter 1-3 - IRB

IRB

  • Submit IRB application. Allow 4-6 weeks for approval

If you propose using human subjects in the research study, collaborate with your Dissertation Chair on the IRB application and submit it to the IRB committee for review and approval.

Click here to access the Southeastern University IRB Homepage 

Your Dissertation Chair is the Principal Investigator [PI] on all dissertation research studies using human subjects; you are considered a Student Investigator.

PLEASE NOTE: The IRB paperwork (including IRB-E [exempt] forms) must be completed, submitted, and approved before conducting your study. 

After approval by the IRB and the dissertation committee, begin collecting data and ensure the protection of human subjects before, during, and after conducting research.

Demonstrate ethical and professional behavior when conducting research.

Dissertation Proposal and Chapters 1-3 - Chapter 1: Introduction

Chapter One: Introduction

  • Use the dissertation template. Carefully proofread Chapter One and edit the chapter according to APA and scholarly writing standards.

  • In consultation with your chair, polish Chapter One before submitting Chapter One to GWS.

  • When your chair believes Chapter One is ready for review, submit your best version of Chapter One to GWS two times (required). Additional reviews by GWS are not available.

  • After the GWS review, your chair will send Chapter One to the methodologist and third reader. The chapter should be a clean copy with all previous comments deleted and all track changes removed.

  • Revise Chapter One according to the recommendations of your committee members. Be sure to carefully edit the revised content.

Dissertation Proposal and Chapters 1-3 - Chapter 2: Literature Review

Write a comprehensive review of the related literature (helpful article for guidance)

Chapter Two: Literature Review

  • Search library databases to saturate the literature. Helpful resources, “Writing Resources” and “Proposal and Chapters 1-3,” are available on the EdD portal,
    • Reminder: To review a study, please include the following elements: authors and date of publication, research question, sample population, method and approach (qual/quant), type of analysis (t-test, ANOVA, etc.), findings, and implications of the study. Download and save a copy of the notes template (see below). Use the template to guide you as you write your notes.
  • In consultation with your chair, write and polish Chapter Two. Carefully proofread chapter two and edit according to APA and scholarly writing standards.
    • When your chair believes Chapter Two is ready for review, submit your best version of Chapter Two to GWS two times (required). Chapter Two may be reviewed an additional two times (the maximum number of reviews is four times).
  • After the GWS review, your chair will send Chapters One and Two to the methodologist and third reader. Sending both chapters will enable the readers to check for continuity. The chapters should be clean copies with all previous comments deleted and all track changes removed.
  • Revise Chapters One and Two according to the recommendations of your committee members. Be sure to carefully edit the revised content.
  • Lit Review Excel Spreadsheet

    Use this spreadsheet to organize your sources and to guide you as you review studies for your literature review.

  • Framework for Conducting and Writing a Synthetic Literature Review

    This article presents a framework that provides guidance to researchers to write a quality synthetic literature review.

  • How to write a literature review video

    video from North Carolina State University

  • notes template for lit review

    Use this template to guide you as you review the literature for your lit review.

Dissertation Proposal and Chapters 1-3 - Chapter 3: Methodolgy

Chapter Three: Methodology

  • Discuss Chapter Three with the methodologist.
  • Incorporate the advice from the methodologist and, in consultation with your chair, write Chapter Three.
  • Carefully proofread Chapter Three and edit it according to APA and scholarly writing standards.
    • When your chair believes Chapter Three is ready for review, submit your best version of Chapter Three to GWS two times (required). Additional reviews by GWS are not available.
  • After the GWS review, your chair will send Chapter Three to the methodologist and third reader along with Chapters One and Two so readers can check for continuity. The chapters should be clean copies with all previous comments deleted and all track changes removed.
  • Revise the chapters according to the recommendations of your committee members. Be sure to carefully edit the revised content.
  • Resources for transcribing interviews

Dissertation Chapter 4-5 - Chapter 4: Analysis

Analyze, interpret, and report the results of the research.

Chapter Four: Analysis

  • Discuss data analysis with the methodologist.
  • Incorporating the advice from the methodologist and in consultation with your chair, write Chapter Four.
  • Carefully proofread Chapter Four and edit according to APA and scholarly writing standards.
    • When your chair believes Chapter Four is ready for review, submit Chapter Four to GWS two times (required). Additional reviews by GWS are not available.
  • After the GWS review, your chair will send Chapter Four to the methodologist and third reader along with Chapters One through Three so readers can check for continuity. The chapters should be clean copies with all previous comments deleted and all track changes removed.
  • Revise the chapters according to the recommendations of your committee members. Be sure to carefully edit the revised content.
  • Resources for transcribing interviews

Dissertation Chapter 4-5 - Chapter 5: Discussion

Chapter Five: Discussion

  • Discuss Chapter Five with your chair and the methodologist.
  • Incorporate the advice from the methodologist and, in consultation with your chair, write Chapter Five.
  • Carefully proofread Chapter Five and edit it according to APA and scholarly writing standards.
    • When your chair believes Chapter Five is ready for review, submit your best version of Chapter Five to GWS two times (required). Chapter Five may be reviewed an additional two times (the maximum number of reviews is four times).
  • After the GWS review, your chair will send Chapter Five to the methodologist and third reader along with Chapters One through Four so readers can check for continuity. The chapters should be clean copies with all previous comments deleted and all track changes removed.
  • Revise the chapters according to the recommendations of your committee members. Be sure to carefully edit the revised content.
  • Editor Verification Form

Dissertation Chapter 4-5 - Editing Process

Editing Process

  • After Chapters One through Five have been approved by your chair, methodologist, and third reader, contact the EdD administrative assistant to secure an EdD approved editor.
  • Submit the complete dissertation to the approved editor. Be sure to send your best product to the editor to decrease the need for additional submissions and to reduce expenses.
  • Obtain verification of completed editing from the editor (use the Editor Verification form).
  • Editor Verification Form

The Defense - In Preparation for Dissertation Defense

In Preparation for the Dissertation Defense

Begin preparation for your defense well before the scheduled date and make sure to apply for graduation by the appropriate due date listed in the academic calendar.

  • Last day to defend for spring commencement: March 15
  • Last day to defend for fall commencement: October 15

Your chair will schedule your dissertation defense after all the necessary approvals are received.

After your chair and committee are satisfied with the edited dissertation, your chair submits the edited dissertation along with the Editor Verification form to the University Review Committee via email to urc@seu.edu. The dissertation should be a clean copy with all previous comments deleted and all track changes removed. Allow 30 business days for review.

  • Make revisions as requested by the University Review Committee.
    • Submit revised dissertation to editor if required by URC.
  • Receive final approval of the written dissertation from dissertation committee. The dissertation must be ready for publication prior to defending the dissertation.
  • Your chair will set dissertation defense date with the EdD administrative assistant.

Resources

The Defense - Dissertation Defense and Final Processes

The final step in the dissertation process is an oral defense of your dissertation. Your chair can schedule a dissertation defense only after you have received approval from the University Review Committee.  You must be enrolled during the term in which you defend the dissertation. All members of the dissertation committee must be present either in person or remotely.  The EdD Chair, the COE Dean, and guests may also attend the dissertation defense as observers.

Dissertation Defense

Defend your dissertation. The dissertation defense presentation should be no longer than 30-35 minutes. Please be sure to use the dissertation defense PowerPoint template.

A typical dissertation defense may follow the following sequence:

  • Introduction and Overview of the defense by the Dissertation Chair
  • Presentation of the dissertation by the student (typically a PowerPoint presentation)
  • Committee comments and questions for the student
  • End of the public portion of the meeting
  • Committee Executive Session without the student
  • Committee private conversation with the student – decision and next steps

Final Processes

  • Your chair will submit the defense rubric to EdD administrative assistant after the dissertation defense.
  • If revisions were requested at the defense, complete the revisions and send the revised dissertation to your chair. Your chair and committee must approve final revisions before the dissertation is considered the final version.
  • Obtain signatures for the signature page. Place signature page in the final copy of the dissertation.
  • Submit the completed, edited dissertation to ProQuest.
  • Dissertation Defense Template__QUALITATIVE

    This is a PowerPoint document useful for the preparation of a dissertation defense. This template serves as a basic guide for the defense; however, students may need to adjust slides according to their dissertation. Students should consult their chair prior to the defense date regarding the contents of the presentation.

  • Dissertation Defense Template__QUANTITATIVE

    This is a PowerPoint document useful for the preparation of a dissertation defense. This template serves as a basic guide for the defense; however, students may need to adjust slides according to their dissertation. Students should consult their chair prior to the defense date regarding the contents of the presentation.

  • Defense Rubric

The Defense - Evaluation

Evaluation of the Dissertation Defense

Based on the committee’s evaluation, the members may make one of the following decisions:

Pass. You have completed the dissertation with no more than minor revisions and have passed the dissertation defense.

Pass with modifications.  Revisions to the dissertation are necessary, but the committee is willing to examine the rewriting without requiring another oral defense. You will have four weeks to complete the requirements by the committee.  Revisions should be sent first to the Dissertation Chair, who will circulate the revised dissertation to the dissertation committee and call for an up-or-down vote by a specific date. 

Fail. The committee has determined that the dissertation is unsatisfactory after revisions and/or re-defense and that you may not rewrite.

When you have successfully defended your dissertation, you may call yourself “Dr.”   The title becomes effective immediately even though graduation may come later.

However, all changes and revisions to the final dissertation document must be made and approved by your Dissertation Chair prior to graduation and prior to submission for public distribution in ProQuest and other online venues.

Publishing your Dissertation - Congratulations

Congratulations on the successful defense of your dissertation!

The following information will help you in the process of publishing and ordering your dissertation.

We strongly suggest you read the information from each tab.

Publishing your Dissertation - Publishing the Dissertation

Publishing your Dissertation: A Step-by-Step Guide

1. Create a ProQuest ETD account.

  • You can use your SEU or personal email to set up your account. If you need to change your email address in the future, you can do so under the My Profile tab.

2. Complete the basic details.

  • Author (You!)
  • Primary Language
  • Institution ID (this will be your SEU ID number)

3. Select your publishing settings and copyright preference.

  • There is no cost for traditional publishing.
    • ProQuest offers to include your dissertation in the Open Access area with free downloading (even to people without subscription access to ProQuest) for $95.
    • However, because we load dissertations into the Digital Commons (FireScholars) your dissertation is already Open Access and searchable from Google.
    • Paying for ProQuest OA does make your dissertation easier to download from ProQuest and will provide a ProQuest download counter.
    • In the end, paying the fee to have your dissertation OA in ProQuest with download counter is a personal choice.
  • There is a fee to file for copyright. This is optional, although recommended.
    • As of 2018, the fee for copyright is $55.00. Please double check the amount when selecting this option.

4. Upload the PDF version of your dissertation.

  • If you use Microsoft Word to make a PDF, rename your dissertation.
    • Microsoft likes to claim them by naming your PDF dissertation, “Microsoft Word -...”
  • You must include the approval signatory page along with your full dissertation.
  • This includes publication in SEU FireScholars.

5. Select your degree/department information.

  • Degree date (year of your defense)
  • Degree awarded (Doctor of Education)
  • Year manuscript completed (year of your defense)
  • Department (College of Education)

6. Select your subject categories

  • You must choose one primary category. Select the one that best represents the whole of your work.
  • After your primary category is chosen, ProQuest will allow you to select two additional subject categories.

7. Choose your six keywords.

  • Use the keywords included on the abstract page of your dissertation.

8. Upload your abstract.

  • Copy and paste the abstract from your dissertation.

Your FireScholars Dissertation will be accessible here once it is published.

Publishing your Dissertation - Ordering a Copy

Ordering your Dissertation: A Step-by-Step Guide

You have the option to order printed copies of your dissertation. You can do this during the publishing process (follow the steps on the screen).

If you would like to wait and order printed copies of your dissertation after it is published to ProQuest, you can do so via the ProQuest Dissertations & Theses page.

  • You will need to use your ETD login credentials to order your dissertation from ProQuest.
  • We recommend that you do not place an order until you can confirm your work is published in ProQuest.

Important: You must order a hardcover, 8 1/2 x 11in, single copy of your dissertation for the College of Education.

Dissertation Templates

Dissertation Templates

Downloadable documents designed to help students complete their dissertation are available below. Make sure you download the correct template! The templates are arranged according to the step of the dissertation process. The available templates include:

Dissertation Proposal Template: a Word document useful for the writing and formatting of the dissertation proposal. The template includes level one headings to inform the student of the necessary elements to include in the proposal.

Dissertation Template: a Word document useful for the writing and formatting of the dissertation. The margins in the template are set specifically for the dissertation format. The headings have been defined and have been linked to the table of contents, which will enable you to quickly update the page numbers as your content is added to each chapter.

Dissertation Defense Template: a PowerPoint document useful for the preparation of a dissertation defense. This template serves as a basic guide for the defense; however, students may need to adjust slides according to their dissertation. Students should consult their chair prior to the defense date regarding the contents of the presentation.

  • Dissertation proposal Mixed Methods Explanatory-Sequential

  • Dissertation Proposal Template__QUALITATIVE

    This is a word document useful for the writing and formatting of the dissertation proposal. Since the proposal eventually becomes chapter 1 of the dissertation, students should discuss the contents with their chair prior to defending their proposal.

  • Proposal Defense Qualitative Revised

    Revised 2/24/21

  • Dissertation Template__QUALITATIVE

    APA 7. This is a word document useful for the writing and formatting of the dissertation. Directions on how to use the level headings are included. All the margins are preset. The table of content can be updated automatically as you add your own content.

  • Dissertation Defense Template__QUALITATIVE

    This is a PowerPoint document useful for the preparation of a dissertation defense. This template serves as a basic guide for the defense; however, students may need to adjust slides according to their dissertation. Students should consult their chair prior to the defense date regarding the contents of the presentation.

  • Dissertation Proposal Template__QUANTITATIVE

    PROPOSAL: Quantitative
    This is a word document useful for the writing and formatting of the dissertation proposal. Since the proposal eventually becomes chapter 1 of the dissertation, students should discuss the contents with their chair prior to defending their proposal.

  • Proposal Defense Quantitative Revised

    Revised on 2/24/21

  • Dissertation Template__QUANTITATIVE

    APA 7 This is a word document useful for the writing and formatting of the dissertation. Directions on how to use the level headings are included. All the margins are preset. The table of content can be updated automatically as you add your own content.

  • Dissertation Defense Template__QUANTITATIVE

    DEFENSE: Quantitative
    This is a PowerPoint document useful for the preparation of a dissertation defense. This template serves as a basic guide for the defense; however, students may need to adjust slides according to their dissertation. Students should consult their chair prior to the defense date regarding the contents of the presentation.

Quantitative Template

Quantitative Templates

Downloadable documents designed to help students complete their dissertations are available below. Make sure you download the correct template! The templates are arranged according to the step of the dissertation process. The available templates include:

Dissertation Proposal Template: a Word document useful for the writing and formatting of the dissertation proposal. Since the proposal eventually becomes chapter 1 of the dissertation, students should discuss the contents with their chair prior to defending their proposal.

Dissertation Template: a Word document useful for the writing and formatting of the dissertation. The margins in the template are set specifically for the dissertation format. The headings have been defined and have been linked to the table of contents, which will enable you to quickly update the page numbers as your content is added to each chapter.

Dissertation Defense Template: a PowerPoint document useful for the preparation of a dissertation defense. This template serves as a basic guide for the defense; however, students may need to adjust slides according to their dissertation. Students should consult their chair prior to the defense date regarding the contents of the presentation.

Mixed Methods Template

Downloadable documents designed to help students complete their dissertations are available below.  Make sure you download the correct template! The templates are arranged according to the step of the dissertation process. The available templates include:

Dissertation Proposal Template: a word document useful for the writing and formatting of the dissertation proposal.  Since the proposal eventually becomes chapter 1 of the dissertation, students should discuss the contents with their chair prior to defending their proposal. 

Dissertation Template: a word document useful for the writing and formatting of the dissertation. The margins in the template are set specifically for the dissertation format. The headings have been defined and have been linked to the table of contents, which will enable you to quickly update the page numbers as your content is added to each chapter. (coming soon. In the meantime, use either the quantitative template or the qualitative template for correct margins and to utilize the linking ability of the heading levels and the table of contents).

Dissertation Defense Template: a PowerPoint document useful for the preparation of a dissertation defense. This template serves as a basic guide for the defense; however, students may need to adjust slides according to their dissertation. Students should consult their chair prior to the defense date regarding the contents of the presentation. (coming soon)

Qualitative Template

Qualitative Templates

Downloadable documents designed to help students complete their dissertations are available below. Make sure you download the correct template! The templates are arranged according to the step of the dissertation process. The available templates include:

Dissertation Proposal Template: a Word document useful for the writing and formatting of the dissertation proposal. Since the proposal eventually becomes chapter 1 of the dissertation, students should discuss the contents with their chair prior to defending their proposal.

Dissertation Template: a Word document useful for the writing and formatting of the dissertation. The margins in the template are set specifically for the dissertation format. The headings have been defined and have been linked to the table of contents, which will enable you to quickly update the page numbers as your content is added to each chapter.

Dissertation Defense Template: a PowerPoint document useful for the preparation of a dissertation defense. This template serves as a basic guide for the defense; however, students may need to adjust slides according to their dissertation. Students should consult their chair prior to the defense date regarding the contents of the presentation.

Helpful Videos

Academic Integrity Policy

Editing Services

If you would like to request editing services, the following individuals have been approved as SEU editors. Use the contact information to connect with the editor.

Dissertation by Design, Editing Services

Dr. McClaslin, Editing Services

Video - How to Check the Alignment of Citations and References

Avoiding Plagiarism

Academic Integrity Policy

Writing Literature Reviews

Practice Exercises

Pronouns

Gerunds and Infinitives

Grammar Add-On Resources

? About Application Process

How do I apply?

What is the due date for applications?

  • Applications are received throughout the year and will be reviewed until May 1 for applying to be a part of the upcoming summer cohort.
  • Applications are received throughout the year and will be reviewed until November 1 for applying to be a part of the upcoming spring cohort.
  • Qualified applicants will be accepted and admitted upon approval by the EdD committee.
  • Applicants will be notified as soon as they are accepted.
  • Students accepted in the program will be registered for their courses by the EdD administrative assistant.
  • Students may be provisionally accepted based on writing samples submitted in the application packet.
    • Provisional students are required to take the APA-Style Academic Writing for Graduate Students course (EDUC 8010) prior to the start of their doctoral program.
    • Students starting in the summer term will take EDUC 8010 in MAY.
    • Students starting in the spring term will take EDUC 8010 in NOVEMBER.
  • GRE scores that do not meet the cut-off scores will not prohibit a student's acceptance into the program.
  • Because the GRE is cross-walked to the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT), we can also accept the GMAT in lieu of the GRE.

What is the school code to have GRE scores sent to SEU?

  • SEU’s school code is 5621.

? About Program Structure

How is the SEU EdD program structured? Is it based on a cohort model?

The SEU EdD program is based on a cohort model. Students will advance through a specific course sequence as part of a cohort of students and remain with this same cohort throughout the duration of the program.

When does each cohort begin?

  • Generally, the spring cohort begins the first week of January and the summer cohort begins after Father's Day in June.

How many years will it take the average full-time doctoral student to complete the program?

  • The course work takes approximately 2 years and one semester for full-time students (7 full-time semesters, including summer semesters).

  • Full-time students take one class every 8 weeks (two classes per spring, summer, and fall 16-week semesters).

  • Once reaching the dissertation phase, students must enroll in at least one dissertation course (2 credit hours) in each semester (spring, summer, and fall semesters). The dissertation phase requires a minimum of 12 credit hours. Many students successfully complete the dissertation phase in six semesters (2 years) of continuous enrollment (spring, summer, and fall) after all course work is completed. Some students move more quickly through the dissertation phase and take more than 2 credit hours of dissertation credits per semester.

Approximately how many courses will be offered online as opposed to face-to-face?

  • All courses are offered as 8-week, asynchronous online courses with two exceptions:

    • A required one week-long face-to-face intensive course (EDUC 6013, Principles of Leadership and Ethics) will be completed in either the Spring A (January) or Summer A (June) term depending on the student's cohort start date. EDUC 6013 must be successfully completed prior to enrollment in other courses.

    • Students will complete EDUC 7023, Quantitative Research during a one-week, face-to-face intensive class. This course is typically taken one year after EDUC 6013.

What learning management system will the doctoral program use for the online courses?

  • SEU uses MyFire and The Learning House, which are online course management systems using BrightSpace as the learning platform. The Learning House offers 24/7 technical support for students and faculty members and facilitates the structure and look of each course to maintain consistency.

How much group work is required in each course?

  • The amount of group work required depends on the instructor; some instructors require group work, and some make it optional. The amount of group work also depends on the specific course, as some courses lend themselves to collaboration and some courses do not.

? Why an EdD at SEU

What makes SEU's doctoral program different from other doctoral programs?

  • We believe that our faculty, staff, and students make us unique, but the following are some other desirable qualities:
    • Our mission and focus are based on Christ and servant leadership.
    • Our program follows an interdisciplinary design and the faculty and students represent multiple disciplines and specializations.
    • Our faculty use a personalized approach which encourages students to complete the program without delays.
    • The program is rigorous; it will prepare students for higher levels of service and advocacy in any chosen field.

What can I do with a doctoral degree in education?

  • Some possible career options include working in administration or teaching at a college or university, as well as serving as an area coordinator for a school district or nonprofit, curriculum specialist, consultant, program evaluator, or other related profession.

What is the difference between a PhD and an EdD?

  • The PhD is designed to prepare students for a lifetime of conducting research in a given field and/or teaching research at advanced levels. The PhD degree often involves a greater number of credit hours and experience in research design, research methods and statistics, as well as conducting research under the tutelage of a faculty researcher with a greater emphasis on publication in scholarly journals.
  • The EdD, on the other hand, is typically designed to be a practitioner’s degree in which the student applies theory and research within his or her current field, discipline, or profession.
  • Both the PhD and the EdD are considered terminal degrees and typically require the defense of a dissertation.

? Library

Is there an online library available for research purposes?

  • SEU’s Steelman Library offers a collection of databases for doctoral-level research. 

? Writing Support

Are any writing services available for doctoral students?

  • The Graduate Writing Support (GWS) faculty serve as writing coaches. Therefore, they will suggest changes but will not make those changes. The student is responsible for implementing any suggestions that are given.
    • The GWS faculty are not responsible for course tutoring. The student is responsible for knowing and understanding the parameters of each assignment.
    • The GWS faculty will review grammar, mechanics, flow, and style (APA) in a given assignment as requested by the student. This assignment review will take place online and is not a one-on-one, face-to-face session. The student is responsible for reviewing the content of each assignment.
    • The GWS faculty are not responsible for the content of the student’s work nor are the GWS faculty liable for the grades the student earns in any course.
    • GWS is not an editing service.
  • Students may schedule a one-hour block of writing support per week via the You Can Book Me site provided below.
    • You Can Book Me Link
    • Students will receive a confirmation email from the You Can Book Me site with a link to a Google Form. This Google Form is where the assignment to be reviewed should be submitted. All submissions should be Word documents using the .doc or .docx file ending.
  • Visit the Graduate Writing Support page for more information.  

? Accommodations for Disabilities

What if I have a disability?

  • Southeastern University’s faculty and staff are committed to ensuring that you have a great experience in the Doctor of Education program. Once accepted into the program, contact the Office of Academic Success (OAS) to document a diagnosed condition and the accommodations required. You will need to email each professor as you progress through the program to inform him or her of your accommodations that have been approved by OAS. More information can be obtained by calling OAS at 863.667.5041.

? Intensive Weeks

Is housing available on campus for the face-to-face winter and summer intensives?

  • Housing is not available for the spring and summer intensives. A list of local hotels will be provided in a welcome email, sent prior to the start of the face-to-face course.

? Tuition and Fees

What is the anticipated cost of tuition per credit hour?

  • Tuition for the doctoral program is $500 per credit hour

Are there separate fees or expenses for this program?

  • There is a $50 application fee (waived if you attend an open house or are an SEU alum)
  • A $180 graduation fee (required whether or not you participate in the graduation ceremony).
  • Unlike at many other universities, there are no fees levied each semester or term.

? Costs for Books and Supplies

Is the cost for books separate or figured into my overall tuition?

  • The cost for books is separate from the tuition. Books are typically ordered separately and paid for by the student through the bookstore and/or online sources.

How much do books cost?

  • We suggest budgeting $120–$150 per course for books.

? Available Financial Aid

Is there financial aid available for military students?

  • Please contact SEU financial services for information. A number of veterans and active duty doctoral students attend SEU using their GI Bill.

Are there scholarships for clergy or faculty dependents?

  • There are no scholarships available at this time for clergy or faculty dependents.

How can I check due dates and amounts for repayment of financial aid?

Do you offer graduate fellowships for the doctoral program?

  • We do not offer graduate fellowships at this time. However, we are looking into securing possible donors to endow fellowships for outstanding doctoral candidates.

Provisional Status

What do I need to do to change my provisional admission to regular admission?

  • Provisional Standing
    • Students who do not meet all the admission requirements may be considered for provisional standing. To obtain provisional standing, the applicant must demonstrate to the faculty of the particular program that he or she is capable of graduate work by meeting most of the requirements for admission while providing an acceptable plan for completing any requirement(s) that is/are deficient and/or by demonstrating ability to do graduate-level work by completing 12 credit hours of graduate study with a B (3.0) or better in each course and/or satisfying other provisional requirements set at the time of admission.
  • The appropriate graduate faculty will review the status of the provisional student each term. After the student successfully completes 12 credit hours and fulfills other terms according to provisional admission, the student will be reclassified as a regular standing student.  A student may remain on provisional standing for only 12 credit hours unless special circumstances exist and permission for an extension is given by the EdD committee.

? Transfer Credits

Can I transfer graduate credits from another university into SEU’s doctoral program?

  • Yes, if the following conditions are satisfied:
    • The courses are doctoral level courses at 6000 level or above, earned at an accredited university, less than 7 years old, and are relevant to the coursework at SEU.
    • The student earned a 3.0 or better in the course.
    • The student's advisor has final approval authority of the transfer based on information provided by the student in the course substitution form.
    • The College of Education Ed.D. Committee has determined that once an Ed.D. student begins his or her coursework at SEU, no transient credit (future courses taken at another university) will be allowed except on a case-by-case basis as approved by the Ed.D. Committee.

How many credit hours can I transfer into SEU’s doctoral program?

  • Students can transfer a maximum of 14 credit hours.

? Non-regionally Accredited Schools

What if my master's degree is from a university without regional accreditation?

Can I still be admitted to the Doctor of Education program?

  • Graduates from non-regionally accredited master's programs may apply for admission to Southeastern University graduate programs. These applicants may be admitted with provisional status on a case-by-case basis at the discretion of the dean and faculty of the college housing the graduate program. Admission decisions will be based on the overall application (which may include a request for additional evidence of qualifications), as well as the quality of the master's program. Provisional students must complete their first four courses (12 credit hours) with at least a B (3.0) in each course in order to continue in the program.
  • Provisional Standing
    • Students who do not meet all the admission requirements may be considered for provisional standing. To obtain provisional standing, the applicant must demonstrate to the faculty of the particular program that he or she is capable of graduate work by meeting most of the requirements for admission while providing an acceptable plan for completing any requirement(s) that is/are deficient and/or by demonstrating ability to do graduate-level work by completing 12 credit hours of graduate study with a B (3.0) or better in each course and/or satisfying other provisional requirements set at the time of admission.
  • The provisional student must comply with all general academic requirements expected of students with regular standing such as prerequisites and amount and quality of work.  Failure to meet any of the provisional requirements will result in the student being dismissed from the graduate program.
  • If during the provisional period the student complies with all admission requirements and is ready to move from provisional standing to regular standing, the appropriate graduate faculty will notify the Office of the Registrar. The Change of Standing Form will be forwarded to the Office of the Registrar. 
  • The appropriate graduate faculty will review the status of the provisional student after the student completes 12 credit hours or according to other terms consistent with the provisional admission requirements. A student may remain on provisional standing for only 12 credit hours unless special circumstances exist and permission for an extension is given by the EdD committee.

Required Courses for All Students - Doctoral Core

(15 Credit Hours)

  • EDUC 6013: Principles of Leadership and Ethics (NOTE: This course is completed as an intensive week and is a prerequisite for all other courses)

    This course studies the theories, models, nature, styles, skills, and dynamics of effective leadership. Emphasis is placed upon synthesizing these traits and concepts into a model of ethical and servant leadership to lead, manage, and transform organizations.

  • EDUC 6023: Learning and Cognition

    This course is an in-depth analysis of learning and cognition and their impact on instructional practice and policy.

  • EDUC 6033: Historical and Social Foundations of Organizations

    This course outlines the biblical, historical, and philosophical principles and theories that have shaped organizations. An understanding of scriptural, social, and historical foundations will assist students in the analysis of contemporary issues in organizations.

  • EDUC 6063: Program Evaluation

    This course is an exploration of principles and methods of effective program evaluation, including planning, instrumentation, data collection and analysis, and reporting. Case studies in program evaluation will be emphasized.

  • EDUC 6073: Public Policy

    This course addresses theoretical frameworks and research that inform public policy, the impact of public policy, and methods for influencing sound public policy. Students will explore the reciprocal relationships between professional practice and public policy at the local, state, and federal levels.

Required Courses for All Students - Research Core

(9 Credit Hours) 

  • EDUC 7003: Foundations of Research

    This course introduces doctoral students to analyzing and evaluating qualitative and quantitative research. Students will examine the impact of research design on decision making that informs professional practice.

  • EDUC 7013: Qualitative Research

    This course outlines the philosophical foundations, conceptual frameworks, and current trends in qualitative research design, analysis, and reporting. Students will explore methods for gathering, analyzing, and interpreting qualitative data.

  • EDUC 7023: Quantitative Research (NOTE: This course is completed on campus as an intensive week)

    This course explores quasi-experimental, experimental, and correlational research design, analysis, and reporting.

Required Courses for all Students - Dissertation

(12 Credit Hours)

  • EDUC 9000: Comprehensive Exam (0 Credit Hours)

    Ed.D. students must pass the comprehensive exam prior to admission to candidacy and registering for dissertation credits.

  • EDUC 9012-9062: Dissertation (12 Credit Hours)

    The dissertation is the major capstone research and writing project designed to demonstrate program mastery and to make an original contribution to the professional field. Ed.D. candidates must enroll in a minimum of two semester hours each semester while working on their dissertation. A minimum of 12 dissertation hours must be earned before students can graduate. Students may repeat Dissertation 6 up to two times. If a student has not defended their dissertation prior to the end of the third semester in Dissertation 6, a formal request for an extension must be filed with the Ed.D. Chair.

Required Courses for All Students - Rotation Schedule

Information is current as of January 14, 2019

Required Courses for All Students - Intensives

General Information

New Ed.D. students are required to attend orientation on the Sunday evening prior to the start of intensives.

Orientation will run from 6:00 pm to 8:30 pm.

Parking

Parking on campus is free. We have plenty of parking in the grass/dirt lot on the north end of the campus by the soccer field. You may also park in the large lot across the street from the football field. Please allow plenty of time to hike from your parking spot to the B&E building (#9 on the attached map).

Schedule

Classes will usually run from 8:30 am to 4:30 pm each day. Students will have a one-hour lunch break.

Lunch

Lunch is on your own. The only on-campus restaurant is Chick-Fil-A, which has a limited menu.

Chick-Fil-A hours: opens at 8:30 am for breakfast, 11 am for lunch, and closes at 3:00 pm (M-F).

A sample of restaurants close by our campus can be found here. A refrigerator and microwave may be available on campus. Ask your instructor when you arrive.

Housing

All students are responsible for making their own housing arrangements for summer and winter intensives.

Campus Hours [Summer]

Hours are subject to change. Please confirm times when you arrive.

  • Portico Coffee Shop
    • (Mon-Fri) 8:00 am - 4:00 pm
  • Steelman Library
    • (Mon-Thurs) 7:30 am - 8:30 pm
    • (Friday) 7:30 am - 5:00 pm
    • (Sat) 1:00 pm - 5:00 pm
  • Bookstore
    • (Mon-Thurs) 8:30 am - 5:00 pm
    • Bookstore (Fri) 8:30 am - 4:00 pm

Concentration Required Courses - Curriculum and Instruction

Curriculum and Instruction Concentration

Required Courses (12 Credit Hours)

  • EDUC 8003:

    This course is an examination of the theoretical constructs of curriculum development. Students will explore the development and implementation of curriculum, analyze design models, and align curricula with the assessment of learner outcomes. The relationship of curriculum development to teaching and learning will be emphasized.

  • EDUC 7143:

  • EDUC 8023:

    This course explores the influence of research and evaluation on pedagogy and the design and implementation of curricula.

  • EDUC 8033:

    This course provides a practicum in which students will apply theory, knowledge, research, and writing skills developed in the doctoral program to address a critical need or issue in the field of curriculum and instruction. Students will collaborate with an organizational mentor and a faculty mentor to complete a project-based professional development experience.


Curriculum and Instruction Electives

Students choose 2 of the following (6 credit hours):

  • EDUC 8113:

    This course is an examination of organizational leadership and managerial theories and practices to address critical issues facing institutions of higher education in the 21st century, with a special emphasis on servant leadership.

  • EDUC 8133:

    This course addresses current issues and leadership practices associated with diversity including race, ethnicity and national origin, gender and gender identity, age, disabilities and exceptionalities, socioeconomic status, sexuality, and religion. The course is designed to develop appropriate knowledge and competencies of leaders working with diverse populations in educational institutions and professional environments. Students will engage in activities to analyze, evaluate, and apply policies and strategies as leaders to address and reduce disparities within a classroom or work environment.

  • EDUC 8143:

    This course is designed to develop students’ abilities to find grant opportunities, write competitive grant applications, administer grants effectively, and evaluate and report the overall impact of grant initiatives.

  • EDUC 8333:

    This course will focus on and explore how current policies in education impact social justice and related events in the United States. This course will explore how leaders within educational and related systems can help advocate for, implement, and/or change policies that would improve community relations and the reality or perception of social justice.

Concentration Required Courses - Organization Leadership

Organizational Leadership Concentration

Required Courses (12 Credit Hours)

  • OLED 8003:

    This course addresses the structure and design of organizations. Key concepts include management (fundamentals, culture, ethics, environment, decision-making, learning, conflict, communication), planning (strategic management, systems thinking), organizing (theory, structure, design, technologies, and change) and monitoring (performance management, measurement, and effectiveness).

  • OLED 8813:

    This course prepares learners to apply behavioral science to the hyper-turbulent environment of the 21st century. Students will be introduced to techniques and methodologies to systematically produce high-performing organizations. The course helps leaders contrast management versus leadership styles of stability in order to minimize management chaos and instability within organizations.

  • OLED 7453:

    This course identifies critical areas leaders face within organizations. Students will explore ways for leaders to process and confront critical issues in legal, environmental, ethical, resource, and production areas.

  • OLED 8033:

    This course provides a practicum in which students will apply theory, knowledge, research, and writing skills developed in the doctoral program to address a critical need or issue in the field of organizational leadership. Students will collaborate with an organizational mentor and a faculty mentor to complete a project-based experience.

Organizational Leadership Electives

Students choose 2 of the following (6 credit hours):

  • OLED 8113:

    This course is an examination of organizational leadership and managerial theories and practices to address critical issues facing institutions of higher education in the 21st century, with a special emphasis on servant leadership.

  • OLED 8123:

    This course will focus on and explore how current policies in education impact social justice and related events in the United States. This course will explore how leaders within educational and related systems can help advocate for, implement, and/or change policies that would improve community relations and the reality or perception of social justice.

  • OLED 8133:

    This course addresses current issues and leadership practices associated with diversity including race, ethnicity and national origin, gender and gender identity, age, disabilities and exceptionalities, socioeconomic status, sexuality, and religion. The course is designed to develop appropriate knowledge and competencies of leaders working with diverse populations in educational institutions and professional environments. Students will engage in activities to analyze, evaluate, and apply policies and strategies as leaders to address and reduce disparities within a classroom or work environment.

  • OLED 8143:

    This course is designed to develop students’ abilities to find grant opportunities, write competitive grant applications, administer grants effectively, and evaluate and report the overall impact of grant initiatives.

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