Steelman Library
Saturday: 12:00 pm - 8:30 pm
MDT

Advanced Expository Writing

Welcome

Welcome to the SEU English and Foreign Languages Dept. guide. Use the tabs at the top to find sources and information to help you research topics.

English and Foreign Language Guides

Key Resources

Getting Started

On this page and in the tabs are some of the most useful information resources for English and Foreign Language classes.  Check back for pages that are specialized for your course or major.

Additional Information

Ask A Librarian

Circulation

circ@seu.edu
863.667.5059

Reference

863.667.5089

Interlibrary Loan

When you can't access an article or book, remember to request it from ILL at no cost.

Click this icon in a database, or use the Request Library Materials link below.

Request Library Materials Form
Request (books, chapters, journal articles)
Contact ILL at ill@seu.edu

  • You can request books and articles not available at SEU or other local libraries through Interlibrary Loan.
  • Articles will be emailed to you whenever possible.
  • Books will be mailed with pre-paid postage return packaging, if you are an online student.
  • Use links from resources to make requests, or use the Interlibrary Loan Request Form.

Getting Started with Journals - English & Languages

Most of the journal articles owned by Steelman Library can be found online.  Some are found in print.

  • Some of the databases which are especially for English and Foreign Languages are included on this page.
  • If your professor wants you to use a "peer-reviewed" or "scholarly" article, there is often a box on the search page in the database which you can select to retrieve only this type of article.  Generally, these two terms are interchangeable.
  • If you only want to retrieve search results that will give you the entire book or article, choose "full-text" as a search option.

Databases for English and Foreign Language Studies

These databases may be helpful as you research literature in English and other languages.

To find the full text of the article click on a link to the full text. Many journals are available online, but some are in the Library's print collection.

Articles from journals not available at SEU may be requested through interlibrary loan.

  • Request Library Materials Form
    Request (books, chapters, journal articles)
    Contact ILL at ill@seu.edu
  • This link opens in a new window. Scholarly, multi-disciplinary full-text databases accessed in one search.
  • This link opens in a new window. Archive Database usually five years old including Scholarly, full-text periodicals in the Arts and Sciences.
  • This link opens in a new window. The primary periodical index for English and language studies: find books and articles on languages, literature, folklore, and linguistics.

Ask A Librarian

Circulation

circ@seu.edu
863.667.5059

Reference

863.667.5089

LC Classifications, English/Foreign Language

The following Library of Congress classifications may be useful when browsing the shelves at Steelman Library for additional materials on languages and literature.

  • Books are arranged by country of origin of the author in the P section. 
  • If the book's call number begins with the letter P, it is on a general literary or languages topic. 
  • British literature is in PR
  • American literature is in PS
  • Spanish and French books are in PQ.
  • Within the letter classifications, the books are arranged roughly by chronology.  

Ask A Librarian

Circulation

circ@seu.edu
863.667.5059

Reference

863.667.5089

Interlibrary Loan

When you can't access an article or book, remember to request it from ILL at no cost.

Click this icon in a database, or use the Request Library Materials link below.

Request Library Materials Form
Request (books, chapters, journal articles)
Contact ILL at ill@seu.edu

  • You can request books and articles not available at SEU or other local libraries through Interlibrary Loan.
  • Articles will be emailed to you whenever possible.
  • Books will be mailed with pre-paid postage return packaging, if you are an online student.
  • Use links from resources to make requests, or use the Interlibrary Loan Request Form.

Faith and Writing

Oxford English Dictionary

Online Writing Labs

Dr. Cotton's recommended sites

Ask A Librarian

Circulation

circ@seu.edu
863.667.5059

Reference

863.667.5089

Direct Quotations & Paraphrasing

In-Text Citations

After a quote, add the first entry in Works Cited — usually the author's last name and a page reference. "The in-text citation should direct the reader unambiguously to the entry in your works-cited list…" (page numbers used in this guide indicate where the topic is found in the MLA Handbook).

Example: "The quick brown fox jumped over the lazy dog" (Seuss 54).

If using the author's name in your text, do not include it in the parentheses.

Example: In his scholarly study, Dr. Seuss observed that "the quick brown fox jumped over the lazy dog" (54).

If you use more than one work by the same author, abbreviate the title to a noun phrase.

Example: "The quick brown fox jumped over the lazy dog" (Seuss, Fox 117-118).

If more than one author has the same last name, add their first initial, if needed, use the first name.

Example: "The quick brown fox jumped over the lazy dog" (D. Seuss 55).

If two authors wrote the work, list both separated by and, if three or more, list the first author followed by et al

Example: "The quick brown fox jumped over the lazy dog" (Seuss and Johnson 116).

If no pagination information is available, but paragraphs are numbered, include that information.

Example: "The quick brown fox jumped over the lazy dog" (Seuss, par. 56).

If no pagination information is available and paragraphs are not numbered, the work must be cited only in its entirety, but you can include words in your text that indicate about where to find the quote.

Example: In the first third of his article, Seuss mentioned that "the quick brown fox jumped over the lazy dog."

Note: "Identifying the source in your text is essential for nearly every kind of borrowing…quotations…facts…paraphrased ideas" (MLA 57).

Works Cited - Books

Book: General AuthorLastname, AuthorFirstname. Title. Edition. Publication Location: Publisher, Year.  Print.

Book:
Single Author

Gutman, Robert W. Mozart: A Cultural Biography. New York: Harcourt Brace, 1999.  Print.

Book: Two or more works by Same Author

Gutman, Robert W. Mozart: A Cultural Biography. New York: Harcourt Brace, 1999.  Print.

---. Richard Wagner: The Man, His Mind, and His Music. Chicago: U of Chicago P, 1968. Print.

Book:
Two or Three Authors

Hock, Randolph, and Gary Price. The Extreme Searcher’s Internet Handbook: A Guide for the Serious Searcher. Medford: CyberAge Books, 2004.  Print.

Book:
Four or More Authors

Davidson, William, et al. Retailing Management. 6th ed. New York: Wiley, 1988.  Print.

Note: You may also include full names of all the authors in the order listed on the title page.

Book:
No Author

Begin citation with title. For example:

NAICS Desk Reference: The North American Industry Classification System Desk Reference. Indianapolis: JIST Works, 2000.  Print.

Chapter in a Book

Willson, Jr., Robert F. "William Shakespeare's Theater." The Greenwood Companion to Shakespeare: A Comprehensive Guide for Students. Ed. Joseph Rosenblum. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 2005. 47-64.  Print.

For additional examples and explanations, see pages 148-181 in the MLA Handbook (2009).

Online Articles

For scholarly journals that only exist in electronic form on the Web, cite the work like you would for a print article, only conclude the entry with the following items:

  1. Medium of publication consulted (Web)
  2. Date of access (day, month, and year)

If the publication does not include page numbers, use "n. pag." in place of the page numbers.

Example:

Shah, Parilah Mohd, and Fauziah Ahmad. "A Comparative Account of the Bilingual Education Programs in Malaysia and the United States." GEMA Online Journal of Language Studies 7.2 (2007): 63-77. Web. 8 Nov. 2008.

For articles retrieved full text from an online database, include the name of the database before "Web."

Example:

Chan, Evans. "Postmodernism and Hong Kong Cinema." Postmodern Culture 10.3 (2000): n. pag. Project Muse. Web. 20 May 2007.

For additional examples and explanations, see pp. 189-193 in the MLA Handbook (2009).

Non-Periodical Works Cited Only Online

An entry for a nonperiodical publication on the Web usually contains most of the following components, in sequence:

  1. Name of the author, compiler, director, editor, narrator, performer, or translator of the work
  2. Title of the work (italicized if the work is independent; in roman type and quotation marks if the work is part of a larger work
  3. Title of the overall Web site (italicized), if distinct from item 2
  4. Version or edition used
  5. Publisher or sponsor of the site; if not available, use N.p.
  6. Date of publication (day, month, and year, as available); if nothing is available, use n.d.
  7. Medium of publication (Web)
  8. Date of access (day, month, and year)

Each item is followed by a period except the publisher or sponsor, which is followed by a comma. Untitled works may be identified by a genre label (e.g., Home page, Introduction, Online posting), neither italicized nor enclosed in quotation marks, in the place where the title goes.

Example:

Quade, Alex. "Elite Team Rescues Troops behind Enemy Lines." CNN.com. Cable News Network, 19 Mar. 2007. Web. 21 Mar. 2007.

Example with no author:

"Hourly News Summary." National Public Radio. Natl. Public Radio, 20 July 2007. Web. 20 July 2007.

Website Home Page:

Liu, Alan, ed. Home page. Voice of the Shuttle. Dept. of English, U of California, Santa Barbara, n.d. Web. 21 Feb. 2008.

Online Map:

"Maplewood, New Jersey." Map. Google Maps. Google, 23 July 2007. Web. 23 July 2007.

For additional examples and explanations, see pp. 184-187 in the MLA Handbook (2009).

Personal Interviews, Films, Television Programs

An entry for a nonperiodical publication on the Web usually contains most of the following components, in sequence:

  1. Name of the author, compiler, director, editor, narrator, performer, or translator of the work
  2. Title of the work (italicized if the work is independent; in roman type and quotation marks if the work is part of a larger work
  3. Title of the overall Web site (italicized), if distinct from item 2
  4. Version or edition used
  5. Publisher or sponsor of the site; if not available, use N.p.
  6. Date of publication (day, month, and year, as available); if nothing is available, use n.d.
  7. Medium of publication (Web)
  8. Date of access (day, month, and year)

Each item is followed by a period except the publisher or sponsor, which is followed by a comma. Untitled works may be identified by a genre label (e.g., Home page, Introduction, Online posting), neither italicized nor enclosed in quotation marks, in the place where the title goes.

Example:

Quade, Alex. "Elite Team Rescues Troops behind Enemy Lines." CNN.com. Cable News Network, 19 Mar. 2007. Web. 21 Mar. 2007.

Example with no author:

"Hourly News Summary." National Public Radio. Natl. Public Radio, 20 July 2007. Web. 20 July 2007.

Website Home Page:

Liu, Alan, ed. Home page. Voice of the Shuttle. Dept. of English, U of California, Santa Barbara, n.d. Web. 21 Feb. 2008.

Online Map:

"Maplewood, New Jersey." Map. Google Maps. Google, 23 July 2007. Web. 23 July 2007.

For additional examples and explanations, see pp. 184-187 in the MLA Handbook (2009).

Sound Recordings, Musical Compositions, Performances

You may include other information (names of performers, directors, etc.) if they are pertinent. List the most important as the main entry.

Entire Albums

The Beatles. Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Heart Club’s Band. Capitol Records, 1967. LP.

Individual Songs

Sinatra, Frank. “Strangers in the Night.” Rec. 1966. My Way: The Best of Frank Sinatra. Warner, 1996. CD.

Spoken Word Recording

Darling, Sally, narr. To Kill a Mockingbird. 1960. By Harper Lee. Recorded Books, 1988. Audiocassette.

Musical Composition

Beethoven, Ludwig van. Symphony No. 7 in A Major, Op. 92. Boston: Oliver Ditson, 1932. CD.

Musical Score

If part of a series, include that information after the medium.

Beethoven, Ludwig van. Symphony No. 7 in A Major, Op. 92. 1811. New York: Belwin, 1994. Print. Kalmus ConcertMasters Series.

Performance

The Nutcracker. Dir. Richard Clark. Butler Ballet. Clowes Memorial Hall, Indianapolis. 2 Dec. 2008. Performance.

For additional examples and explanations, see pp. 193 -211 in the MLA Handbook (2009).

Zotero-Citation Management

It is a free, easy-to-use Firefox extension to help you collect, manage, and cite your research sources.

Zotero works with Microsoft Word to create your bibliography for you.

MLA Overview

There are two different manuals for MLA Style Citations.

The MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers is mostly used by high school and college students and was most recently updated in 2009. It gives step-by-step advice on every aspect of writing papers, from selecting a topic to submitting the completed paper. It provides an authoritative presentation of MLA documentation style for use in student writing.

Reference LB2369.G53 2009

The MLA Style Manual and Guide to Scholarly Publishing is mostly used by graduate students and professionals and was most recently updated in Summer 2008. It offers complete guidance on writing and documenting scholarly texts, submitting them for peer review, and preparing them for publication.

Reference PN147.G53 2008

Additional Information

Database Error

Off campus users may experience a loading issue when using the Article Search box or specific databases. Please use an Incognito Browser while the issue is being fixed.